Flies & Fly Tying Yabbies and Big browns

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #885468

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    After a bit of hit and miss and trial and error,I have finally settled on something that will hopefully bring a few big browns undone.

    P3140015-2

    #885471

    butch
    Participant

    Looks very polished finished, I’d be very pleased with that, well done. Lets hope the Brown’s think the same!

    #885482

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    I knew it would be worth waiting for. Yet another PB innovation setting the standard.

    Ripper finish on that beastie.  Cheers….J

    #885483

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    Ripper finish on that beastie. Cheers….J

    Two different finishes there Jimmy,the one on the left is au naturel,the one on the right is finished with UV resin,Which do you prefer?

    #885488

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    I would have to go for the natural version PB

    There is just something about that one that rings true to my eyes. When does the testing program begin?

    Cheers…J

    #885505

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    As soon as I can put some distance between me and the lawn mower.

    #885507

    BarryJ
    Participant

    At the risk of starting a bun fight, if you are targeting big trout, it probably isn’t worth using UV resin as only small trout (up to the parr stage) actually see UV.

    What Trout See

    From the article:
    <h5><i>The Great Debate</i></h5>
    <i>UV or not UV; that is the question. Do trout really see ultraviolet (UV) light? Is it important to their feeding activities? These are questions anglers and tiers alike have hotly debated for many years. And not without just cause, since until recently, conflicting research has fostered a lack of consensus even among the scientific community.</i>

    <i>UV light is rays of electromagnetic radiation that’s just beyond the deepest shade of violet. The largest natural source comes from the sun, and it’s what likely caused that sunburn you got from a long day on the water last summer. Unfortunately, ultraviolet light is largely invisible to humans, so we lack an appreciation for what it actually looks like.</i>

    <i>The ovoid shape of the trout eye allows for two simultaneous focal lengths—one to the front for near vision and to the side for far fi eld vision. Both are in clear focus at the same allowing trout to eat with discrimination and remain on the lookout for predators or anglers. (Thomas Barnett/Courtesy of Stackpole books)</i>

    <i>The latest research indicates that while all trout have UV-light-sensitive cones up until roughly the parr stage, which is when a fish is just a few inches long, trout beyond that stage (juvenile and adult trout) no longer have UV-dedicated cones. By then, the UV-sensitive cones have switched from detecting ultraviolet light to a wavelength of blue light in the visual spectrum. The bottom line is that by the time a trout is old enough to have any interest in a fly, it has lost its UVlight-specifi c cones and almost all its ultraviolet-light sensitivity.</i>

    <i>When I was working on my book, Trout Sense, Dr. Iñigo Novales Flamarique, one of the world’s leading researchers on trout vision, told me, “As for the use of ultraviolet vision in young salmonids (with UV cones), the UV cones enhance the contrast of zooplankton prey and improve the fish’s foraging performance. Nothing is known about the function of UV vision in salmonid fishes at later stages in nature, and it is doubtful that it serves any ecological purpose once the UV cones are gone.”</i>

    <i>Does that mean that I’ve discarded all my UV-light tying material? Not at all! I love the stuff; even discounting its UV-light characteristics, it’s as iridescent as a drake mallard’s head, which can appear black, blue, or green, depending on the angle of light. The wings and other features of insects have a natural “shimmer” that’s imitated by UV material.</i>

    #885511

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    Thanks for the info Barry,most helpful.

    cheers

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