Talking Tactics Surf Fishing

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #863102

    Theophilus
    Participant

    Hello all,

    I’ve often wondered if fishing the Victorian surf with the long rod is viable, given how rough many of the beaches are.

    Does anyone fish rough surf? If so, what sort of setup do you use?

    #863105

    Chris Beech
    Participant

    Rough surf is a pain in the arse.

    Mandatory is a sinking line (minimum a full Intermediate, but the SA Striper IV or newer Sonar I/3/5 are more efficient) and a proper stripping basket. Not a palette, not a clip, not a side shooter – a stripping basket like Orvis or Linekurv.

    Flies like Surf Candies, Clousers and McVays Gotcha work very well fished on a 12-16lb tapered leader.

    Fish the gutters and channels and target areas of lighter surf. Used to fish Anderson’s Inlet a fair bit, which was fairly sheltered but not overly productive. Best on an incoming tide.

    #863107

    SLamontagne
    Participant

    A two-handed overhead casting rod makes fishing in the surf much easier. Line management is a challenge but, unlike Chris, I am a fan of the line pallet. It is not perfect but better suited for a two-handed rod because you can sit it lower on your hip. Decievers are nice on a twohander but not Clousers, as they can break the rod easily.

    Still, even with a two-handed rod you need mild conditions and to focus on gutters next to the beach.

     

    #863123

    Theophilus
    Participant

    Thanks for the advice all, much appreciated. I haven’t been able to find any information about fly fishing local surf, so any tips help.

    It looks as though surf on fly has a strong following in America, especially the west coast, however I’m not sure how the conditions on the average beach there would compare.

    I’d love to give some of the beaches around the Mornington Peninsula a try.

    #863124

    Butt Head
    Participant

    If you pick days with a good off-shore wind and fish in places with a good drop off into deeper water, such as in rips and channels or towards the rocky bluffs at the ends of the beach, it’s doable enough. The off-shore wind will flatten the seas and give you a few extra metres of casting distance. An intermediate shooting head can give you some additional distance as well. Surf candies were designed specifically for these conditions.

    Personally, I wouldn’t even bother with beach fishing on rough surf days. The suspended sand particles in the waves will stop most fish from coming in close anyway, as they don’t like it in their gills.

    #863136

    Theophilus
    Participant

    Thanks for the tips. Now I have to decide whether I want to invest the money in a proper setup for surf or not. I’m looking for fishing to supplement stream and lake fishing, especially over the closed season.

    #863142

    Chris Beech
    Participant

    If you grab a dedicated #8 outfit, you can use it on the bayside beaches for flathead , salmon and silver trevally.  The same outfit can travel up north for general saltwater, CXI bonefish, and for our natives. A popular all around rod weight.

    #863156

    Theophilus
    Participant

    Thanks Chris, I’m going to look into tackle and then work on technique. I think it’s well worth diversifying one’s target species with the fly rod.

    #863307

    Theophilus
    Participant

    I’ve done some research on rods – what are the opinions on this double-handed rod or similar? It’s either going to be this or a single-handed 8-9 weight as some suggest:

    echoflyfishing.com/project/boost-beach/

    #863309

    dynaflow
    Participant

    I see a single handed rod being more versatile,inasmuch as double-handed rods use water hauling as their primary loading mechanism.Try this on a Bonefish flat and you’ll frighten every fish within a kilometre.Horses for courses and all that…

    #863311

    woody-wood
    Participant

    There are 11ft to 15ft two hand rods designed for overhead casting in the surf.

    Most switch two handed rods paired with the right line can overhead cast.

    This was posted on the RIO blog in 2002.

    https://www.rioproducts.com/learn/double-handed-rods-in-the-salt

    There is a bit about surf fishing with switch rods on some of the US forums.

    #863314

    Theophilus
    Participant

    Dynaflow, you make a good point about spooking fish in shallow environments, however, I won’t be chasing bonefish any time soon. I’m looking for a rod and line combo to deal with rough and tumble of the surf, not to mention the howling winds.

    Single-handers would definitely be more versatile, but I’d be willing to sacrificw versatility for reasonable gains in ease of casting in adverse conditions.

    #863320

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    Hi Theo…. There is a fairly fast action Echo two hander specifically designed for what you are doing, and its pretty good bang for the bucks. Beach Boost I think it is called. It doesnt have to be quite that specific in regards to doubles though. I use a 6/7 weight 12’6″ rigged up with an Outbound Short fast intermediate for all my salty adventures. It is a pretty short head so it casts readily overhead but does ok with the water loaded casts as well. Another great line is that Airflo 40+ in fast intermediate. It is a much longer head but still casts a treat overhead and is wicked good fun in big winds.

    In regards to casts Dynaflo is spot on to a point… A skagit cast complete with the white rat is about the noisiest thing around, and a double spey not much better. But a snake roll into a single spey touch and go works out pretty well.

    #863322

    dynaflow
    Participant

    Then there’s the new skills to be learned of course!

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