Species Talk Strange things caught on fly

Viewing 5 posts - 31 through 35 (of 35 total)
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  • #880900

    mitch aka 2 fish
    Participant

    ha ha… leave it to a coloradan.

    youse guys will eat everything not covered in snow or a bra*.

    (go to ft collins colorado. …perhaps return. I wouldn’t hold it against you…)

     

    cheers.

    shawn

    #880903

    DrGraham
    Participant

    Not sure what this is? A Sleepy Cod maybe? Caught in Coffs estuary on a shrimp pattern. Buried itself in the sand one hooked & I had to carefully handline it free.CoffsCodPeachyShrimp

    It’s hard to tell what fish it is while still in the water, but it’s not a gurnard or any other member of the Family Triglidae (sea robins and gurnards) or Scorpaenidae (scorpionfish, stone fish etc.).  Judging by the shape of the mouth and position of the eyes, I reckon it’s a stargazer, Uranoscopidae, and most likely a species of the genus Kethatostoma.

    #880932

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    Right… I am never cooking up something that unpronounceable, thats for sure.

    As for the snow and the bra appetite business… I did have a nice little hot spring setup about an hours drive west of Ft. Collins and a useful hours walk up a mountainside.  A small detail not fully appreciated by all the invitees for some reason… but it was great fun in a snowstorm! Tequila chilling in the snowbank etc. etc…  typical 70’s game plan.

    Nice flashback…..Jimmy

     

     

    #880936

    mitch aka 2 fish
    Participant

    estas? ’nuff said.

     

    cheers!

    #881062

    thommo227
    Participant

    Not sure what this is? A Sleepy Cod maybe? Caught in Coffs estuary on a shrimp pattern. Buried itself in the sand one hooked & I had to carefully handline it free.CoffsCodPeachyShrimp

    It’s hard to tell what fish it is while still in the water, but it’s not a gurnard or any other member of the Family Triglidae (sea robins and gurnards) or Scorpaenidae (scorpionfish, stone fish etc.). Judging by the shape of the mouth and position of the eyes, I reckon it’s a stargazer, Uranoscopidae, and most likely a species of the genus Kethatostoma.

    Yes, I think you are correct.  Eyes were right on top and sort of closed.

Viewing 5 posts - 31 through 35 (of 35 total)
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