Tackle Talk skagit for murray cod???

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 48 total)
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  • #846487

    woody-wood
    Participant

    Can’t comment on tackle you are using for your situation, but as general rule the leader/tippet should be the weakest point in the whole system. If you are using a shock tippet usual practice is to drop back down the normal leader strength after the 1m of shock tippet.

    You will always snag up some time and you want the leader to let go before the tip or line. 20lb mono is a lot cheaper than a tip or a fly line. Also it is hard trying to put enough pressure on the line to break off a fly on a snag under water if the leader is 40lb.

    #846491

    Wet
    Participant

    should there be any concerns about the 26lb test strength of the commando tips considering that leader/tippet can be as much as 40lb for abrasion resistance? i don’t think any other tips are higher test.

    I don’t think it will be a problem. Get out a spring balance and see what you can pull through your rod, most people won’t be able to get half way (seriously). 10kg is a good pull and there is still some strength in reserve 🙂

    #846495

    Wet
    Participant

    Can’t comment on tackle you are using for your situation, but as general rule the leader/tippet should be the weakest point in the whole system. If you are using a shock tippet usual practice is to drop back down the normal leader strength after the 1m of shock tippet.

    You will always snag up some time and you want the leader to let go before the tip or line. 20lb mono is a lot cheaper than a tip or a fly line. Also it is hard trying to put enough pressure on the line to break off a fly on a snag under water if the leader is 40lb.

    Good point Woody, I read it as a bite tippet? but if there isn’t a lower breaking strain than 40lb there might be some tears somewhere along the line, 20lb is pretty common, add 12-18″ of bite tippet (12″ max for IGFA records).

    #846503

    codfather
    Participant

    yeah ok, so if i add 6-8″ of heavy mono from the fly to the leader with the leader being less test strength than the tip it should be fine. the bite tippet only being there for abrasion resistance in their mouth.

     

    cheers guys, this conversation has been most helpful.

     

     

    #846511

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    You are certainly doing pretty well Codfather, with all the research and relevant questions. It is good to see the Forum working at its best. I can understand your frustration in trying to find or even translate these beasties. Had it not been for Shawn, Rampant, Kim and all the rest I would have been completely screwed years ago, when I started playing with double handers.

    Just reading between the lines it seems to me that a Rio switch chucker might be usefull for you. I have one of those in 420 gn as well as an Outbound Short coming in at 425 gn, Both lines will hoik out a soggy zonker with ease. As for tips I have found the Airflo poly-leaders to be effective. They come in 9ft and 12ft set ups, they are nice and supple with a good range of sink rates… and they are clear which is cool.

    I don’t think I could do any of them with a single hander however, but I do so love the single handed spey line on my 9ft river rod. That is one design our man Mr. Gawesworth should be very proud of indeed.

    Tight lines Codfather… you are very close now….. Cheers…Jimmy

    #846515

    codfather
    Participant

    yeah the rio single hand spey line is really nice. it will see plenty of use for the smaller bass and carp flies and trout occasionally.

    again, thanks for everyone’s input. it’s great to have a source of knowledge and experience to draw from.

    wish i had a dollar for every hour i’ve spent reseaching and trying to wrap my head around this before parting with $$$. i could nearly pay for the skagit setup.

    #846520

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    beware of line addiction…. 5 DH sticks and 12 different lines  seems about par for the course. All of them absolutely essential of course….

    I find myself wondering even more about your casting situations Codfather.  Skagit lines are one thing… skagit casts quite another.  Boats I can deal with, Kayaks not so much…Knee deep in water being about the easiest to manage of all.

    Regards…CodIgnorant

    #846532

    codfather
    Participant

    wet wading in summer is fine and is often welcome respite from the heat. i fish from a canoe quite often, though it’s hard to find enough water that will float a canoe around here at the moment.

    i have a hunch that skagit would be ideal for float tubers.

    #846595

    codfather
    Participant

    Is there anywhere that sells level T material by the foot off a bulk roll? I might play with making some tips.

    #850529

    codfather
    Participant

    i bit the bullet and got a 300gr commando head and a 7.5′ ‘run’ S4 tip from Tom’s outdoors. i had my first session with it on the water yesterday afternoon and first impressions are it’s not as easy at first as the single hand spey line scandi taper. with the cod flies i get more of a lob than a loop. with the sink tip and sinking fly it almost seems like there is too much anchor that bleeds energy trying to lift it from the water on the forward cast. snap T’s seem to be the worst, i think because there is more time for the tip and fly to sink while you setup the D loop for the forward cast. the double spey was much better. i suspect because the anchor was moving while setting up for the forward cast meaning the sink tip and fly were shallower in the water. the perry poke was good too as i was able to keep the sink tip moving the whole time while setting up for the forward cast.

    when i took the fly off the results were much nicer and i could feel the rod load much more.

    i noticed the head was pretty neutrally buoyant. it didn’t float high and dry like i expected. i ordered a floating tip from Big Y fly shop in USA last night and i’m eager to try that and see the difference.

    overall i wasn’t blown away with sudden ability to cast big flies but i think with a floating tip and some practice it will be a useful method for targeting cod while walking. it certainly already delivers the big flies to a usable distance with no back cast so that is a huge step in opening up more water.

    #850612

    freestone
    Participant

    Try using the snake roll to get your anchor closer to the surface and then maintain your momentum to form your D loop. Works for me.

    #850628

    codfather
    Participant

    Yeah good idea. I did try a few snake rolls but found it was pretty easy to blow the anchor because the amount of line outside the rod tip is much shorter. I will try a more compact action next time.

    You certainly have to be quite dynamic between setting the anchor and forward casting with a sink too on. If that tip has any time to sink it’s game over. It will be interesting to see the difference a float tip makes

    #850632

    codfather
    Participant

    <p style=”text-align: left;”>Do you generally always have to have the rear of the head at the rod tip before casting or can you have more line out than that?</p>

    #850694

    freestone
    Participant

    There are so many variables, probably better for you to view LineSpeedJedhi’s youtube video called Snake Roll Spey Cast, Baby Steps through big lines, if you already haven’t viewed it.

    #855460

    codfather
    Participant

    after a bit more experience and a couple of fish landed with the skagit setup i thought i would cut and paste some comments i wrote on a different thread which are relevant here.

    skagit is a game changer for bank fishing for cod IMO.  it handles the heavy flies well and you have the versatility of being able to change the tips between floating and sinking. i bought some level T line and made my own sink tips in addition to the OPST sink tip i have. i can now fish places that you simply can’t when you are limited to overhead casting with the ‘normal WF ‘ line that is recommended for cod. essentially the skagit is a WF line on roids.

    i see no reason to use a WF line for cod ever again. the commando head does what a WF line does plus you can skagit cast with no room behind.

    some advantages i’ve found of the short head and tip length are (15′ head and 7.5’ tip)                                                                     1- i have found it much better suited to overhead casting where desired because you only need the head and tip outside the rod to make a long cast because it shoots so well. this means less backcast room required for the same length cast and no false casting to shoot line like a WF line. just strip in to the head, lift and shoot it back out again.

    2- you can strip in closer to the bank and be ready to cast sooner because the head and tip length are so short.

    3- it works well tenkara style in real tight, close quarters situations. you can flick little roll casts at will. great for cruising carp and working little spots.

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