Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #889680

    micmac3701
    Participant

    Well it is the season of reading, tying and occasionally venturing out into the cold to be confounded by stillwater midge feeders.

    So time to come clean and reveal those magic secret midge patterns.

    I’ll get the game going with a Hackle Stacked emerging midge pattern that works on occasions (version with abdomen of pearl mylar is also okay). Though I can’t say it does any better than a small griffith’s gnat or Kimball’s emerger.

    Not trying to start a “magic fly” debate just looking for ideas to keep me venturing into the cold to be perplexed by pernicity midge feeders (and something else to fill fly boxes with).

     

    HS-midge

    #889683

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    Ive had a lot of success with this one

    Carl-Nixon-MIdge-pattern-1

    #889688

    DrGraham
    Participant

    Usually when fish are on midges, I go have a cup of tea, or a dram of uisge beatha, until the fish come to their senses. But, I have had some success with a simply tied small brown or black nymph, perhaps with a Griffith’s Gnat, dead drift but keep tight contact with the fly, and use a side strike rather than a lifting strike.  I’ve also had success offering something completely different, as per Rob Sloane’s Fiery Brown Beetle method (Ch. 4, The Truth About Trout).  Sometimes it’s more about just getting the trout’s attention than perfect representation.

    #889732

    flylife
    Moderator

    Tups variants, Wyatt style emergers, Black Gnat (in NZ especially), Griffiths etc are all worth a go, but the odds generally favour sub-surface patterns fished so they draw up towards the surface in the path of a feeding fish. Hanging (drifting) a team of flies can pull big numbers but I lose interest if I’m not casting to feeding fish.

    #889733

    micmac3701
    Participant

    There’s the rub. They are surface feeding so it just doesn’t seem right to have at em sub surface… That attitude changes after a few fly changes and rejections.

    #889735

    flylife
    Moderator

    Unless they are sticking their beaks right out and snipping off the top they are generally feeding on the pupae just underneath, so yes, the parachute style dries and emergers with plenty of meat hanging below will satisfy the purists. The Snowy lakes hatches are vastly different and often more prolific than the ones we see in Tas. I haven’t seen the midge ball frenzies down here, anything like the hatches I have experienced on Euc and Jindy. Really like the look of that hackle stacked emerger BTW.

    #889736

    flylife
    Moderator

    A while back I did fish with a guy who was a fan of ‘my’ Fiery Brown Beetle. (The reserve plumber from Watershed). It took me some time to figure out that he was applying floatant to the fly and fishing it on top! Another option for the purist I suppose. It was working for him so I kept my mouth shut!

    #889743

    Chris Beech
    Participant

    I’ve had success with rocks.

     

    The bigger, the better.

     

    But seriously,  Parasol emerger with a trailing Milly Midge or blood worm has worked, but I’d rather throw stones.

    #889758

    micmac3701
    Participant

    IMG_1616
    Current state of play in the midge box. A lot of experimentation and not much consolidation, which kinda tells the story. No room for rocks Chris, but those are perhaps best sourced in situ.

    Its a good thing there are also smelt feeders about to keep us sane, or some relative thereof.

    #889789

    luvnat
    Participant

    Have you guys seen this on youtube?

    #889793

    Gerard
    Participant

    Have you guys seen this on youtube?

    I’m intrigued  – what is it?

    #889802

    luvnat
    Participant

    On Youtube : Peter Appleby Deadly Dry Fly Method for sipping Trout

    #889819

    DrGraham
    Participant

    So, having waded through a half-hour of Durham accent, it’s just another foam suspender buzzer pattern.  These have been around for at least the four decades I’ve been fishing.  It was all the fad on UK reservoirs in the 80s and 90s.  I’ve used similar myself on UK and Japanese stockie bashing ponds with no real difference in fish catch rate compared with using a small brown or black nymph fished just below the surface or suspended in the surface film.  On Japanese fishing ponds I’ll catch about 20, 30, 40 per day, which is about exciting as instant noodles are to fresh handmade pasta.

    For those struggling with the Durham accent, and the Youtube closed caption text is not much better, the chap is fishing with an 8 wt line, 15-20 ft fluorocarbon leader, greased for the first 10-15’ (why use fluorocarbon then?) and the last 5’ ungreased, floatant applied to the foam post (why?).  And no, it’s not dry fly fishing.  It’s a nymph/buzzer pattern which is a wet fly.  If most of the fly is in the water, is it not wet?

    #889821

    flylife
    Moderator

    Foam in a dry fly! 😬 Just a little tweak with a fly ya can’t see in the filum is arl ya need!

    It’s my old man’s ‘Damp’ from the 70s. Or you could tease out the Fiery Brown a bit, gink the feather fibre back and call it Uncle Bob.😂

    #889848

    micmac3701
    Participant

    See the orange caps (2nd row left) is the same thing but I’m planning on using them to suspend a midge pupae and the orange is so I can see what’s going on.

     

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.