Tackle Talk Leader material

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • #867614

    Jason King
    Participant

    Hi all,

    l have been making up my own leaders for a while now and I really like being able to adjust them depending on if nymph/wet or dry fly fishing and was wondering what material people who make their own are using to make them?

    I was shown a formula for the lengths of each section which I like, and I was also shown how to make my leaders using Maxima Ultragreen.

    While I quite like the Ultragreen I have noticed the breaking strain/line diameter is quite bad compared to some of the more modern lines around now.

    Cheers,

    Jason.

    #867615

    wyldone
    Participant

    The breaking strain/line diameter is kinda irrelevent unless you’re talking about tippet.

    Maxima is pretty strong stuff even right down to 3lb.

    If want a finer/stronger tippet, build all except the tippet of your leader out of Maxima, then just add your tippet of choice from any other quality brand.

    #867617

    MJL
    Participant

    I have been using SA Absolute Trout tippet.   It is really strong for diameter even compared to the previous SA product.  Maxima probably functions a bit stronger than it says on the spool but still doesn’t come close to the SA.  I use factory tapered leaders but would be using SA if I tied my own.

    #867620

    Jason King
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies,

    My leader out of maxima at the moment goes from .50 down to .22(6lb).
    I bought some SA absolute clear tippet the other week at .2o which i didn’t realise at the time is rated at 9lb.

    So I am going up in strength but down in diameter for tippet.

    Would this cause problems of breakage at the point where the 6lb joins the 9lb?

    Jason.

    #867621

    MJL
    Participant

    The leader will break at it’s weakest point which is usually that knot anyway.  If I put a fly in a tree and have to break it off the tippet mostly goes with it.   I don’t think you would be making it any worse.

    #867622

    Peter Gibson
    Participant

    What Maxima might lack in strength for diameter, it more than makes up for it in its ability to lay out a beautifully straight leader. And it knots beautifully. I love the stuff. There are retailers who will sell you a complete box of assorted sizes you need to make hundreds of leaders, for the price of about 10 factory leaders.

     

    #867623

    dynaflow
    Participant

    “So I am going up in strength but down in diameter for tippet.”

    Actually this is what I look for in a tippet.

    #867639

    Great Lake
    Participant

    I use a thick butt (not sure of the brand) but then Maxima all the way down except I invest in a good thin strong tippet.  Maxima is reliable and provides the perfect step downs in diameter through most of the leader.  I prefer the brown maxima for what it is worth.

    #867659

    micmac3701
    Participant

    I always end up coming back to maxima, knots hold and great abrasion resistance (handy when you do a lot of twig water stream-side gardening).

    If fish start getting pernickety about 0.001mm or so we are all in serious trouble.

    #867663

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Over the years, I have alternated between using store bought leaders and tying my own (cahanging between the two options on nothing more than a whim🙄) but over recent years, I have been tying my own. This came about after reading “From Line to Leader”, an article by Peter Morse in FlyLife 79 (Autumn 2015) – until I checked, I would have said it was only a year or two ago🥴.

    The article gives a fairly simple “rule of thumb” for a leader, taking into account rod weight (determines the butt section diameter) and desired length of leader. Peter’s material of choice (for his rule of thumb) is Maxima Ultragreen but I also use Maxima Chameleon (mostly for just the last section plus tippet). I have also tied up several full Maxima Fluorocarbon leaders.

    I really like the fact that (using Peter’s formula) my leaders are customised to each of my rods and I get what I consider to be great turnover of my fly using them!

    I have also gone back to using tippet rings, joining my last leader section plus my tippet (ie two rings per leader) with them. These make adding new tippet and/or droppers a very simple task.

    #867669

    Gerard
    Participant

    Over the years, I have alternated between using store bought leaders and tying my own (cahanging between the two options on nothing more than a whim🙄) but over recent years, I have been tying my own. This came about after reading “From Line to Leader”, an article by Peter Morse in FlyLife 79 (Autumn 2015) – until I checked, I would have said it was only a year or two ago🥴.

    The article gives a fairly simple “rule of thumb” for a leader, taking into account rod weight (determines the butt section diameter) and desired length of leader. Peter’s material of choice (for his rule of thumb) is Maxima Ultragreen but I also use Maxima Chameleon (mostly for just the last section plus tippet). I have also tied up several full Maxima Fluorocarbon leaders.

    I really like the fact that (using Peter’s formula) my leaders are customised to each of my rods and I get what I consider to be great turnover of my fly using them!

    I have also gone back to using tippet rings, joining my last leader section plus my tippet (ie two rings per leader) with them. These make adding new tippet and/or droppers a very simple task.

    Barry, i’d be interested to get more details explaining use of two tippet rings and a couple of examples of common setups?

     

     

    #867672

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Not much to explain really. Below is the diagram from Peter’s article I referenced above. In it, he shows either a triple surgeon’s knot (I only use a double🙄) or a tippet ring to connect the tippet to the leader, crudely circled in red and labelled 1 by me. I usually use a second tippet ring at the second last knot in my leader (in blue and labelled 2 by me). If I want to use a dropper (or two) I just tie the dropper to the tippet ring(s).

    4D9211CB-ED02-4CFC-B4D7-1695A801F137

    I have also attached an enlarged pic of a tippet ring and a snap swivel holding ten of them (this is usually how you purchase them); you tie the first knot on to the tippet ring before you remove it from the snap swivel!🥴

    633BFA80-EB57-4BEE-87F7-35057451543F

    4DDA6EE9-8094-4043-8DA8-04013D31A460
    NB: the tippet rings on the snap swivel appear to have a square cross-section but it was the only pic I could find. It is most important (IMHO) that the cross-section of the rings be round to avoid damaging the knot.

    #867687

    Peter Gibson
    Participant

    I’ve used tippet rings lake fishing over past few years…they certainly are handy for nighttime tying of tippet and for droppers. But some tippet rings are better than others.

     

    #867693

    Gerard
    Participant

    Not much to explain really. Below is the diagram from Peter’s article I referenced above. In it, he shows either a triple surgeon’s knot (I only use a double🙄) or a tippet ring to connect the tippet to the leader, crudely circled in red and labelled 1 by me. I usually use a second tippet ring at the second last knot in my leader (in blue and labelled 2 by me). If I want to use a dropper (or two) I just tie the dropper to the tippet ring(s).

    4D9211CB-ED02-4CFC-B4D7-1695A801F137

    I have also attached an enlarged pic of a tippet ring and a snap swivel holding ten of them (this is usually how you purchase them); you tie the first knot on to the tippet ring before you remove it from the snap swivel!🥴

    633BFA80-EB57-4BEE-87F7-35057451543F

    4DDA6EE9-8094-4043-8DA8-04013D31A460

    NB: the tippet rings on the snap swivel appear to have a square cross-section but it was the only pic I could find. It is most important (IMHO) that the cross-section of the rings be round to avoid damaging the knot.

    excellent – thanks

    #867696

    BarryJ
    Participant

    I’ve used tippet rings lake fishing over past few years…they certainly are handy for nighttime tying of tippet and for droppers. But some tippet rings are better than others.

    Definitely agree Peter. I prefer either Rio or Hanak rings. Hanak have the minor disadvantage that they do not come on a snap swivel, so you have to place them on a swivel before use; only a minor inconvenience though.

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