Tackle Talk Golden Perch and Cod Gear

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #850487

    mitchmcm
    Participant

    I have been fishing for cod and golden perch for more than a few years now and im wanting a bit more of a challenge. I have read a fair portion of the limited information available but its difficult to get a consolidated answer on the fly gear for these species. I’m wanting to know what weight and length rods and specifically models. It seems like 10wt 8ft rods but i have no idea where to start for goldens? lines and reels? I also want to target them in float tubes so what float tubes are hardy and best designed for flowing rivers.

    I will be fishing rivers only at this stage and maybe Mulwala. So casting distances of no more than 10m i’d say.

    Cheers.

    #850511

    freestone
    Participant

    The types of flies (bulkiness, weight, air resistance) that you will be casting for these species will largely determine the lines you will need. Generally speaking you will need high mass lines to effectively deliver these flies (lines like Rio outbound short or Rio Big Nasty will get the job done). And you will need a heavier rod (more like a 9 to 10 weight) to effectively cast these lines for cod.  You could scale back a bit for golden perch, maybe a 7 to 8 weight rod – the flies will be not as big as cod flies but still big.

    Reels are easy.  Most of your battles with these species will be done in hand to hand combat, rather than off the reel.  So all you require in a reel will be substantial storage capacity for the very bulky lines you will be using. You will not need a reel with a tuna stopping drag.

    Re the mobile fishing platform, inflatable float boats / kick boats like those made by Incept in NZ or Water Master in USA are ideal.  Very maneuverable with fins and oars as well.  Safer on rivers too than float tubes in terms of coming to grief in underwater snags and rapids.  You are up higher in a float boat and much more out of the water. Very handy when a 6’ tiger snake asks for a lift.

    #850552

    aybe
    Participant

    I reckon Freestone has pretty much nailed it.I use an Incept float boat and reckon its the best thing since sliced bread(But I think maybe the sitting position is a bit lower than a tube?)I have a mate who used a tube in the past in some places you mention and managed a few cod but its hard work and the fun wears off quickly.I haven’t used one but maybe the new Vision Down Under 9wt version might cover your needs.Cheers Ash

    #850564

    codfather
    Participant

    Check out my skagit for cod thread. Some good info there. I just dived into an OPST skagit setup for cod. It allows me to roll cast and spey cast big flies with no back cast room plus you can overhead cast too. My experience with the heavy weight forward taper lines is that they are good for overhead casts only which severely limits opportunities other than from various watercraft.

    A 15ft skagit head out of a kick boat, with casts inside 20m would be more versatile and enjoyable than constantly overhead casting and false casting to change direction like what is needed with ‘conventional’ cod setups.

    #850756

    mitchmcm
    Participant

    The types of flies (bulkiness, weight, air resistance) that you will be casting for these species will largely determine the lines you will need. Generally speaking you will need high mass lines to effectively deliver these flies (lines like Rio outbound short or Rio Big Nasty will get the job done). And you will need a heavier rod (more like a 9 to 10 weight) to effectively cast these lines for cod. You could scale back a bit for golden perch, maybe a 7 to 8 weight rod – the flies will be not as big as cod flies but still big.

    Reels are easy. Most of your battles with these species will be done in hand to hand combat, rather than off the reel. So all you require in a reel will be substantial storage capacity for the very bulky lines you will be using. You will not need a reel with a tuna stopping drag.

    Re the mobile fishing platform, inflatable float boats / kick boats like those made by Incept in NZ or Water Master in USA are ideal. Very maneuverable with fins and oars as well. Safer on rivers too than float tubes in terms of coming to grief in underwater snags and rapids. You are up higher in a float boat and much more out of the water. Very handy when a 6’ tiger snake asks for a lift.

    Tank you very much. It sounds like rod and line set up among all things is the most tricky thing to get right. Where did you get the float boat from? and do you have any reference to others in the form of durability?

    I reckon Freestone has pretty much nailed it.I use an Incept float boat and reckon its the best thing since sliced bread(But I think maybe the sitting position is a bit lower than a tube?)I have a mate who used a tube in the past in some places you mention and managed a few cod but its hard work and the fun wears off quickly.I haven’t used one but maybe the new Vision Down Under 9wt version might cover your needs.Cheers Ash

    I will look into the float boats. The Vision sounds good. Rod options seem like a tricky thing. Not a lot of options especially at an entry level for it.

    Check out my skagit for cod thread. Some good info there. I just dived into an OPST skagit setup for cod. It allows me to roll cast and spey cast big flies with no back cast room plus you can overhead cast too. My experience with the heavy weight forward taper lines is that they are good for overhead casts only which severely limits opportunities other than from various watercraft.

    A 15ft skagit head out of a kick boat, with casts inside 20m would be more versatile and enjoyable than constantly overhead casting and false casting to change direction like what is needed with ‘conventional’ cod setups.

    I have been reading it. Some very interesting ideas that make a lot of sense and some i am veryyyy confused about. Are you using the lines on traditional rods?

    #850788

    aybe
    Participant

    Mitchmcm

    Check this site out for a wealth of info.https://codscountry.wordpress.com/ Nick hasn’t updated for a while but there’s plenty still there.The floatboat is a very versatile craft but the main advantage is having both hands free to cast and at the same time manoeuvre the boat.Where I fish this is crucial near enough is rarely good enough.Also when you hook a good one you can kick back and pull him out of the snags.Check out the “one arm paper hangers”on YouTube trying to do that in a paddle kayak.Pedal versions would be better though.

    Floatboats drawback would be that they really can only be fished downstream.They are quite efficient to row upstream and I have an electric on mine also.Or if you have a mate the two car shuffle.Both of mine I bought secondhand off here.Paddlesports in Melbourne is the Aussie distributor.

    Ash

     

    #850800

    codfather
    Participant

    yeah i’m using it on a standard 9′ 8WT rod.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.