Talking Tactics Fly Fishing Jindy and surrounding lakes/dams

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #865225

    Mitch2540
    Participant

    Hey guys, any help or info is much appreciated.  After fishing the thredbo for a while with a fair amount of fish, I was hoping to take my barely used 6wt to the lake.  I live right on lake Jindabyne and not sure what methods or tackle I should be using?  Streamers with a sinking line?  Chironomids on a 12ft leader with a midge ball top fly? I am keen on droppping in to see the boys at the shop to ask for some tuition, but thought I’d swing it by you guys first.  I have a decent 6 wt floating line on a very cheap setup but any guidance would be great!  Also I just fish from the bank, I have a boat it just lives on the coast, bugger..

    Tight lines, Social distancing n all that fellas! – Mitch

    #865232

    MJL
    Participant

    Mudeye patterns after dark.  Sinking pattern (e.g. Craig’s Nighttime) on the point and floating wake fly (e.g. Cubits Mudeye) on a dropper tied fairly high up the leader. I prefer grassy bays rather than rocky shore.

    #865265

    Haveweimwillhunt
    Participant

    Mudeye patterns after dark. Sinking pattern (e.g. Craig’s Nighttime) on the point and floating wake fly (e.g. Cubits Mudeye) on a dropper tied fairly high up the leader. I prefer grassy bays rather than rocky shore.

    @MJL, out of curiosity what is the ratio of takes betweent he sinking pattern (point fly) and floating wake fly (dropper)?

    #865269

    MJL
    Participant

    It’s typically a transition.  I arrive a bit before dark and there is usually a bit of a wait before it gets dark enough for the fish to begin to move into the shallows.  The first hits will come on the sunk fly at the very beginning of your retrieve (i.e. very far end of your longest cast).  As time goes on and it gets darker, the mudeyes really start to migrate towards shore in numbers, the fish will move in closer and eventually start to hit the dropper as well as the point fly.  They will reliably switch to the floating fly after it is completely dark.  You will also start to get mudeyes walking up onto your waders to hatch.

    So on a typical evening, I will start with only the sinking point fly and add the floating dropper once it starts to get dark.  The dropper can be simple. Four inches of 10 lb tippet looped directly to the fly line where it joins the leader works and you can have it prepared with fly attached ready to go.  If/when they start reliably hitting the floating pattern, I will happily swap out the point fly and fish two floating patterns.  Be guided by whatever is working.  Really dark nights are different (and I would say better) than one with a moon.  There is no such thing as too dark IMO.

    #865294

    Haveweimwillhunt
    Participant

    Legend, thanks for the pointers.  I have started fly fishing again after +10yrs chasing sambar.  Will defo give it a go when I hit Euc in a couple of weeks

    #865355

    Angus056
    Participant

    Just wondering if the same tactics would be used in winter

    #865376

    MJL
    Participant

    The mudeye hatches are a summer thing. April is about the end of it.

    But in summer this does work anywhere mudeyes are hatching (look for the shucks around the edge on trees and rocks).  In some places you can strike really good fishing after everyone else has gone home.

    #865434

    Mitch2540
    Participant

    Thanks heaps MJL, I just wish I had had your knowledge in the warmer period.  We’ve started to have our first casual jindy frosts so the hoppers are becoming sparce.  Also with the whole “should we flick” scenario I feel fishing on the lake might be safer as it is literally across the road.  I haven’t seen boat or a fisherman in days, but plenty of rises in the morning.  The splashes and explosions I hear at night sometimes though… It’s enough to start donning the waders and thermals at ungodly hours.

    But as it has been pointed out, with the cold weather on its way, what tactics shoild I be using?

    What flies? Morning over afternoons? Both? Streamers with no weight stalking in weed beds? Weighted lines and streamers in deep rocky drops? Small nymphs/midges on a 12ft leader with split and indicator?

    I’ll apologise for the amount of questions but after all the big browns I have seen cruising the shallows in past winters left me with my jaw dropped and my head racing with the question… how?

    If anyone can shed some of their hard earned knowledge on the lakes coming into these colder months, that would be tops!

    Cheers all, Mitch

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.