Books, Photos, Movies, DVDs & Art Book on Aussie insects

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  • #554420

    dje
    Participant

    Hi guys,

    Trying to build my knowledge on this game. Been out to a few lakes recently and have seen plenty of boils or bulges yet not many true slurping rises. Plenty of insects buzzing around but nothing sitting on the surface. I’m figuring that the fish are feeding on emerging patterns yet here enlies my quandary…Is there a reference guide that can help me match the airborne insect to it’s underwater nymph or emerger pattern?

    Cheers
    ben

    #565742

    Trevor Martin
    Participant

    Oldy but a goldy look out for a copy of

    AUSTRALIAN
    Trout Food, Trout Flies
    and how to fish them
    By
    Rob Flower
    RRP $19.99

    #565743

    Peter Gibson
    Participant

    Waterbug Book from CSIRO is pretty useful

    http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/3148.htm

    #565744

    Moderator 4
    Keymaster
    quote Peter Gibson:

    Waterbug Book from CSIRO is pretty useful

    http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/3148.htm

    Available from the FlyLife store http://shop.flylife.com.au/store/viewIt … Product=42

    #565745

    Peter Gibson
    Participant
    quote Moderator 4:

    quote Peter Gibson:

    Waterbug Book from CSIRO is pretty useful

    http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/3148.htm

    Available from the FlyLife store http://shop.flylife.com.au/store/viewIt … Product=42

    And $5 cheaper as well!!

    #565751

    arra
    Participant

    Try "The complete field guide to ‘Dragonflies of Australia’" from CSIRO publishing.

    I have "The Insects of Austraila" 2 volume set from CSIRO as well, but dont use them any where as often as the above.

    Col

    #565752

    swaddo
    Participant

    In a nutshell no. I don’t believe any of these publications extensively map adults to nymphs. At best they touch on the subject. There is a dvd by Ralph & Lisa Cutter (who run a fly fishing school) called "Bugs of the underworld" that is quite good but again it focuses on bugs in the U.S. It covers the while life cycle of selected bugs and is well worth a look

    [Tapatalk made me do it]

    #565753

    Royalwulff
    Participant

    Hi, I have "Systematic and Applied Entomology"

    Possibly basic, but ok for $1.00 from the school fete!

    It has nymphal and adult representation and is Australian

    #565754

    Peter Gibson
    Participant
    quote swaddo:

    In a nutshell no. I don’t believe any of these publications extensively map adults to nymphs. At best they touch on the subject. There is a dvd by Ralph & Lisa Cutter (who run a fly fishing school) called “Bugs of the underworld” that is quite good but again it focuses on bugs in the U.S. It covers the while life cycle of selected bugs and is well worth a look

    [Tapatalk made me do it]

    ‘Insects of Australia’ does cover the life cycle info, but you have to be a bit of an expert to interpret the text. Nonetheless it is interesting browsing, even if you are like me and have to keep looking up terminology etc to understand what is being written.

    ‘The Complete Field Guide to Dragonflies of Australia’ (to give it the full title) is a great book. This is the first book that I’ve ever noticed that costs same in printed book as in ebook format…a sign of what’s to come. Back in the 90s we had the author, Gunther Theischenger, give a series of talks about stream entomology to the NSW Rod Fishers Society…he was fantastic.

    #565756

    Fraser Perry
    Participant

    [u:22rygmir]Insects of Australia [/u:22rygmir]is very good, but does take a time to learn the nomenclature to understand the keys.

    Also get [u:22rygmir]Australian Water Bugs (Hemiptera-Heteroptera, Gerromorpha and Nepomorpha)Their Biology and Identification[/u:22rygmir], Nils Anderson and Tom Weir. Easier to understand, but not as detailed.

    [url:22rygmir]http://www.publish.csiro.au/pid/3834.htm[/url:22rygmir]

    Also get [u:22rygmir]An introduction to aquatic insects of north america[/u:22rygmir], Merritt and Cummins. 90% of the content is relevant to Australian waters. Very good detail.

    [url:22rygmir]http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Aquatic-Insects-North-America/dp/0787232416/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1324074450&sr=8-1[/url:22rygmir]

    #565761

    swaddo
    Participant

    Don’t get me wrong, I reckon some of those books are great i just don’t think they do what is asked very well (i dont have the dragonfly one though so it may), and that is giving examples of nymph, emerger and sub-adult/adult for insects of interest. I’ve tried looking up the same thing and am yet to find very much useful information … for example,. I’d like personally like to know which type of caddis nymph emerges to be a snowflake adult … cased caddis (stick or gravel case?) Hydropsyche (net spinning) or rhyacophila (free living) … which are green with no case but look different. As far as I know the info just isn’t out there in the public domain.

    I know someone has been doing the hard yards and hatching bugs to work this out for mayflies s:up

    in the mean time try this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4UjlT7fqJ1s (and search for "bugs of the underworld" on youtube)

    #565782

    dje
    Participant

    Thanks swaddo, great vid

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