Back Issue Discussions Backpacking Made Simple

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  • #852435

    woody-wood
    Participant

    I liked this article by Greg French for a couple of reasons.

    Greg prompts the readers to get out and enjoy the experience of the Western Lakes before future developments may ruin the experience of remoteness and solitude that this area provides.

    Greg reinforces that to enjoy hike fishing you don’t need to be a supreme athlete with super endurance. Anyone whom has met me soon realises that I have well and truly past my football playing physique of my twenties. I have steel plates in my left knee and right wrist and an as agile and supple as a house brick, but still can (slowly) hike out to enjoy remote fishing.

    That correct gear can make the journey enjoyable without having to cart a caravan on your back to be comfortable. Even though the gear and weight I cart is ancient compared to the ultra modern light weight available now.

    But above all, the need to carry safety equipment and detailed maps so that the individual can be safe, rescued and above all those better halves left at home have peace of mind. I have conducted all my remote fishing solo due to times or locations that suit myself and not others, but always am prepared in case something goes awry. The EPIRB’s available now a days means that rescue is at hand even if that is still a 3 hour wait. Hand held GPS units let you know where you are relative to tracks even if you loose your paper maps.

    Don’t let the unknown stop you from enjoying the experience of remote fishing in whatever location arises.

    Thanks Greg and Tocs (reset in the back country) for getting me looking at maps for this season.

    #852494

    JC2
    Participant

    Yep, he sure is old…… but more steel than a chastity belt.

    Last time he walked out on a tent peg.

     

    #852520

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Definitely a great article by Greg. Hopefully, it has inspired me to dust off my day pack (at the very least) to venture a bit further afield than I have done in recent seasons.

    #852782

    flylife
    Moderator

    Mike Dimond’s short cast is worth reading as a safety reality check too.🤕

    #852868

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Mike Dimond’s short cast is worth reading as a safety reality check too.🤕

    Definitely a safety reality check. In years gone by, if heading off to somewhere new, I would usually carry a map, compass and GPS as well as my PLB but I must admit that if I was heading off to a familiar destination (as was Mike) I would probably have only carried my PLB so I could have found myself in a similar situation! This was avoided only by good luck, not good management!

    I still have my maps, compass and (somewhat antiquated) GPS but my PLB was long past its use by date when I handed it in a couple of years ago. Given Mike’s experience, I will probably purchase a new PLB before I start ambling off into the wild again.

    #852890

    flylife
    Moderator

    Rumour is the ride cost him $800 bucks.

    #852903

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Rumour is the ride cost him $800 bucks.

    Damn! Pretty big incentive to NOT activate a PLB! 😱🥴

    #852907

    woody-wood
    Participant

    My life and or not being berated by the wife for being lost for two days is worth $800.

    Still cheap insurance if you only have to use it once in your life.

    #852916

    DrGraham
    Participant

    Mike Dimond’s article is a must read. Many an angler enjoys the solitude of fishing solo in remote areas – I do. Hopefully, they will advise family where they are going and when they are due back, but anything can happen in between. I’ve even fished sections of the Tyenna River west of Westerway where I’ve not been more than 50 m from the relatively busy Gordon River Rd, yet no one would know where I was or if I was in trouble because of the steep bank and bush between river and road. If you are fishing in a remote area you should carry a location beacon. There are two types, EPIRB Emergency Position-Indicating Radio Beacon – these are large and primarily for maritime use, the other a PLB Personal Locator Beacon – these are much smaller, design for recreational use such as hiking, fishing, small water craft. EPIRBs and PLBs can both be used on land or water. They are monitored by the same agency. The one I recommend is the KTI SA2G PLB, made in Australia, 10 year battery life, waterproof to 3m, accurate to 3m, one hand operation, but incredibly small, light and relatively inexpensive https://kti.com.au/safety-alert-plb/. It weighs 140g and is smaller than most small fly boxes. Mine sits in my top pocket of my vest. It’s with me all the time, rather than sitting in a pack. What happens when you get separated from your gear? Mine cost $259. Never be embarrassed about setting one off, it’s what it’s there for. I know personally that emergency services personnel would rather respond to a call that proves not to be an emergency (even a false alarm) rather than deal with a long search later that has an unfortunate outcome. Ask the question, what’s my life worth? As for the Weld River, I know it reasonably well, although haven’t fished it for a while. I was planning to fish it after last Christmas but then the fires went through. I could have fished it later, but I knew it would have been disappointing fishing amongst the devastation as Mike experienced- maybe in a year or two.

    #853024

    codfather
    Participant

    no one here heard of a garmin inreach?

    #853036

    BarryJ
    Participant

    Hadn’t heard of them until you mentioned them. Probably a great device if you are frequently venturing off on your own but they are more expensive than a PLB and require a subscription service as well.

    #853061

    Mitta
    Blocked

    +1 for the KTI SA2G

    At the time of purchase, I had researched the market pretty well and could not come up with anything better. It was a winner on so many counts.

    After purchase, I discovered that the expiry date on the battery actually gave me eleven (11) years of effective life.

    The $269.00 cost, averaged over 11 years was less than $25.00 per year (there’s no subscription arrangement).  I thought it exceedingly good value, while providing absolute peace of mind.

    Ultimately, the battery is replaceable by the company here in Oz (Melbourne) also.

    A ‘BIG’ thumbs up from me.  👍 👍

    Mitta

    #853201

    BarryJ
    Participant

    +1 for the KTI SA2G

    At the time of purchase, I had researched the market pretty well and could not come up with anything better. It was a winner on so many counts.

    After purchase, I discovered that the expiry date on the battery actually gave me eleven (11) years of effective life.

    The $269.00 cost, averaged over 11 years was less than $25.00 per year (there’s no subscription arrangement). I thought it exceedingly good value, while providing absolute peace of mind.

    Ultimately, the battery is replaceable by the company here in Oz (Melbourne) also.

    A ‘BIG’ thumbs up from me. 👍 👍

    Mitta

    Just purchased one on eBay for $235.00👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻 Battery expiry is July 2030! That’s just under $21.50 per year.

    #853210

    Greg French
    Participant

    Thanks for the feedback – I’m really glad everyone found the backing advice to be helpful.

    It’s funny to me how quickly the thread became focused on the issue of safety. As I alluded to in the article, safety seems to have become much more of a front-of-mind issue than it ever used to be. It’s worth remembering that our preoccupation with electronic gadgetry is also relatively new.

    What I really wanted readers to concentrate on was the ease and enjoyment of backpacking, not the perceived dangers. Honestly, self-reliant exploration of remote and pristine waters has always resulted in my most rewarding fly-fishing experiences. This is true for all my closest friends too, which is hardly surprising when you consider that Australia and NZ are blessed with some of the world’s very best (and safest) backcountry fly fishing.

    With that in mind, I want to remind everyone that FlyLife is trialling back issue articles online for current subscribers – all you have to do is login to access them. Hopefully all the backcountry destinations ever described will become conveniently available in the not too distant future. Read them, be inspired, then tread your own path to adventure. By all means take an EPIRB, but remember that by far the best safety precaution you can take is to take a friend or two. (Friends tend to be better company than gadgets too.)

    #853784

    wilko1
    Participant

    I carry a GME 410 PLB.  I have activated one and been winched into the Air Ambulance chopper from the Jamieson River after a mate was injured.  Some of you may remember my story from years ago.  The ride is free, paid for by us tax payers.  It is the best insurance money can buy.  My wife who is a long distance trail runner carries an Ocean Signal rescueME PLB1.  Not much bigger than a match box.

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