Tackle Talk 5 weight or 6 weight for Tasmania ?

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #869083

    Red Maple
    Participant

    Hello everyone, this is my first post.

    I have a Four weight rod and I would like second rod for nymphing in rivers 70% , dry 10% ,hopper dropper 10% and streamer highland lakes(windy) 10%. I’m leaning towards a 5 weight Scott radian or Loomis NRX LP+. Will these be fast enough for the exposed ,windy lakes or should I get a 6 weight ?    Thanks.

    #869090

    SGP
    Participant

    A fast action four weight has always been my go to to rod on the highland lakes when conditions are right, but on windier days my 590 Radian has been more than enough rod.  I always take my 6 weight as back up but never gets taken out of the tube.

    #869091

    Stephen Hill
    Participant

    Based on your use percentages, a 9 foot slow medium action will cover your bases unless you plan on casting big flies in the wind.

    I’ve a fast 6 weight that gets used out of sentimentality these days.

    #869095

    DrGraham
    Participant

    I have both a Douglas DXF 9’ 6wt and 5wt, plus my old trusted back up Kilwell 6wt, amongst other rods. The Douglas 6 is primarily for the windy heavy days, and for casting streamers and big flies. The 5 is for the calmer days casting dries and nymphs. The Kilwell is a medium to slightly fast rod in my opinion and both Douglas rods are really not much faster despite some reviews listing the DXF as anything from medium-fast to very fast. Frankly, the terms medium, medium-fast, fast etc. are highly subjective. What matters is that the Douglas and Kilwell 6 wt rods handle Tassie’s windy conditions comfortably. I’ve used the 5 wt in the wind, but the 6 wts makes it much easier in controlling the line across and into a wind, allowing me to put the line where I want it. I can let the rod do more of the work and with less pain in my shoulder at the end of the day. Yellowstone Angler Shootout gave both the Douglas DXF 5 and 6 high scores, with the Radian, the NRX and Douglas Sky only scoring a fraction better than the DXF for double the price. I am not advocating the DXF specifically – rods a personal thing and what suits me may not suit another – but there are plenty of other quality mid-range priced rods that will provide excellent service. When I looked at the top range rods, the question I asked myself was why would I pay more than double the price at $1400-1600 for rod that may only offer perhaps 5% better performance? My other question was, why would I need a fast rod to fish streams and lakes when most of the fish I catch are within about 4 rod lengths? Accuracy at short range is more important to me than long distance. In the end, for the price of a top end rod I have two quality mid-priced rods, with left over cash, and I’m better equipped for different conditions.

    #869096

    Chris Beech
    Participant

    Sound advice. You also need to look at the Orvis Recon2 9′ #5 weight… Its a brilliant rod that will do all that you ask of it. If you can, see if you can have a cast of a few rod & line combinations before pulling the trigger.

    #869101

    garygreene
    Participant

    I’m sure either of the 5wts you mentioned would be great. I use a 5wt Method when land based on the highland lakes. In the past I’ve uplined it with a 6wt line, helps with wind and close up polaroiding, but last season I used an SA Infinity 5wt line and it was magic!

    I used to use my TCX 6wt which is a beautiful rod and terrific when it is really windy but it doesn’t get much of a run these days. Depending on your casting, fast action 5wts are the way to go. A bit lighter and more fun to cast. Agree with Chris, test drive a few first if you can.

    #869106

    jimmyellenberger
    Participant

    Well… I will limit my response to saying welcome to Red Maple.

    The other local lads have all the bases pretty well covered. Nobody mentions any trout spey though.

    Good gear when the wind gets disgusting…

    I hope you enjoy the Forum Red, it is fantastic for researching new ideas.

    Cheers…Jimmy

    #869107

    Warnesy
    Participant

    I’d go the 5wt

    #869123

    Red Maple
    Participant

    Thanks everyone for your replies.
    l am leaning towards a 5 weight now. I was expecting everyone to say I should get a 6 weight seeing as I already have a 4 weight.I thought that might be a better combo.

    If I get a five weight NRX+ LP which I think will be great for my primary use ,nymphing. But it might not be the best for small streamers/lakes . Well then maybe in a season or two I could get a mid priced 6 ,Recon, DXF etc. This is what I’m thinking now.

    #869125

    Johnrs
    Participant

    Hi Red Maple

    Yes Two rods will always be more satisfying than one………..

    I use an older six wt Sage, the Z axis, for my Tassie lake fishing,

    mostly in close but it’s a struggle when the fish are out wide.

    John

    #869126

    Gerard
    Participant

    Thanks everyone for your replies.

    l am leaning towards a 5 weight now. I was expecting everyone to say I should get a 6 weight seeing as I already have a 4 weight.I thought that might be a better combo.

    If I get a five weight NRX+ LP which I think will be great for my primary use ,nymphing. But it might not be the best for small streamers/lakes . Well then maybe in a season or two I could get a mid priced 6 ,Recon, DXF etc. This is what I’m thinking now.

    Hey Red Maple,

    I don’t know much (declared up front), but I bet you’ll end up buying a bunch of different rods.  Don’t resist – just go with it (it’ll be easier that way)

    What is a 5 or 6wt anyway? Part of the problem is ell known non-standardisation of some makers.  I just parted ways with a Sage 4wt, which easily measured ERN of 5.5, higher than my 5wt NRX LP has an ERN of ~4.7. (go figure)…  I think its done to lock people into a brand & differentiate from other makers.

    My sage z-axis measured ERN @ 6.2, and I love it.  I might not love a 6wt of higher ERN or different action.

    Nothing wrong with a 6 wt for Tas (if its a true 6wt).  Small fish still feel like small fish on a lower weight rod.

    Nothing wrong with a 4wt…

    Cheers!

     

     

     

     

     

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