Casting & Competition 2019 Victorian Fly Casting Championships

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  • #805745

    Castingsport
    Participant

    It was a pleasure to administer the Victorian State Fly Casting Championships at the weekend and see fly casting at its best. Congratulations to all who competed, particularly those who competed in their first championships. It was great to see those new casters score so well and have fun doing so. A huge thank you to John McIntyre and the Southern Fly Fishers Club for their support of casting in Australia and for allowing the best casting facilities in the country to be used in the conduct of the accuracy and distance events. Corey Heath won the Alec Wallace All Distance trophy, Mark Cuthbert won the Bill Jacobson All Accuracy trophy and Corey won the overall Champion of Champions title. This was my last time as tournament coordinator of state and national titles and it was a pleasure to sign the certificates for those who placed in all four grading levels. Well done to all and thanks for your participation, interest and support.

    John Waters

    #805872

    Gumwah
    Participant

    Hi John,

    Im curious to know what sort of distance the distance casters are getting out to, and what is the most common weight rod for this event?  Im guessing special rods and lines are used but are just curious to know how far the gun casters can throw.

    • This reply was modified 5 days, 7 hours ago by  Gumwah.
    #805957

    Castingsport
    Participant

    Casting outcomes in tournaments are just the same as casting outcomes when fishing, they vary greatly with conditions, particularly wind. The single handed fly casting record is 71.80 metres for the longest cast and the record for the average of three casts is 71.08 metres in Australia. That was a perfect wind day, strong enough to carry the loop but not that strong to prevent the loop unrolling properly on the backcast. In calm days expectations drop to the low to mid 50 metre range. This is with a shooting head line, 15 to 16 metres long weighing 38 grams in total. That is the equivalent of approx 15 metres of a 10 or 11 weight line. Rods are up to 3 metres in length and not super fast tapers, but load along the full blank.

    The above is the traditional single handed distance fly event, however two other distance events are now competed for in Australia and overseas, namely the Trout Distance and the Sea Trout Distance. Both are single handed casting events using lighter gear. Trout distance uses a maximum 9 foot rod and a Scientific Angler 5 weight floating forward taper line that is 120 feet long. Last year a new longest cast in an Australian tournament was set at 38.2 metres with a reasonable following breeze. On a calm day a cast in the low 30 metres is a great cast. The Sea Trout event uses a rod with a maximum length of 10 foot and a floating shooting head line of a minimum 15 metres and comprises generally of an 8 weight double taper cut to  about 15.5 to 16 metres. Cast lengths of between 40 and high 50 metres can be achieved with this gear. Rods used range between 5 weights and 9 weights in these events, with as many actions as are manufacturers.

    Tournament casting is just like fly fishing, the challenge is to get the fly to the target (read fish or selected water) with a minimum number of false casts.

    I’ll post a description of the events (accuracy and distance) on the Forum in the near future.

    John Waters

     

    #805973

    Gumwah
    Participant

    Hi John,

    Thanks for taking the time to give such a detailed reply.  Im sure I am not the only one who finds this interesting and  informative.

    #806125

    Castingsport
    Participant

    No worries  Gumwah, thanks for your interest and taking the time to post your thoughts. I am always amazed with statements made like tournament casters can’t fish, they use gear that you cannot fish with or, they use some technique that is not the same as that used by fly fishos. Any fly fisho can achieve the above results, no secret grips or ways of waving the rod about, just a bit of focus on a few 1%s that will make every fly fishing session easier. I have never hooked a fish at the above distances, nor have I cast that far in a river, lake, estuary or beach, however, being able to achieve them on a casting court sure makes it easier to fish all day in those environments.

    When I post some text and visuals about tournament casting, you will see that each event originated from fishing situations and continue to reflect both traditional and current fishing scenarios, techniques and gear.

    The history of fly fishing and tournament casting has always been, and continues to be closely aligned in respect of gear and casting development and that is the fun part for me.

     

    John Waters

    #806575

    Phoenix Bird
    Participant

    I have never hooked a fish at the above distances, nor have I cast that far in a river, lake, estuary or beach, however, being able to achieve them on a casting court sure makes it easier to fish all day in those environments.

    You have hit the nail right on the head John,someone once said to me that catching a fish is simply about putting the fly where the fish can see it.Good casting technique certainly makes it easier to achieve just that.

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